Risks

Country risk in Mexico is low to moderate. The OECD country risk rating is 3. This indicates a relatively low to moderate likelihood that Mexico will be unable and/or unwilling to meet its external debt obligations; though, individual private and sub-sovereign debtors can and do default. Mexico’s economic performance will continue to be heavily influenced by external developments, including in the US. The government is continuing efforts to strengthen the rule of law, stamp out corruption and reduce crime. But governance issues, uneven reform implementation, illicit drug trade and high levels of violence will remain significant constraints on the operating environment for businesses.

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Political risk in Mexico is low. But Mexico’s governance indicators relative to the rest of Latin America and the Caribbean are mixed. Regulatory quality and government effectiveness are the only two categories where Mexico ranks above the regional average. Despite authorities’ ongoing efforts to tackle corruption and reduce crime, measures of political stability/absence of violence and control of corruption are notably below the Latin American and Caribbean average.

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The OECD also provides a list of country risk classifications. Under the Participants’ system, country risk encompasses transfer and convertibility risk (i.e. the risk a government imposes capital or exchange controls that prevent an entity from converting local currency into foreign currency and/or transferring funds to creditors located outside the country) and cases of force majeure (e.g. war, expropriation, revolution, civil disturbance, floods, earthquakes). The scale is 1 to 7 where 7 is the highest risk.

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Consult the entire list here

Reliability

Know you are doing business with stablished and registered businesses will bring you some peace of mind. 

Only registered businesses can operate internationally. If a business is caught doing something illegal, they will be blocked from trading and they will be part of a 'black list' publicly available. Make sure your business ally in Mexico has all the requirements to trade with you.